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by Chanti Tacoronte-Perez  MA

In school we learn the A, B, C’s or the important aspects of a variety of subjects, however we seem to have missed out the Dhi’s. Dhi is a sanskrit word that means true knowingness, which we can interpret as a gut feeling or highest truth. I will argue that this “illuminated wisdom” as Yogarupa Rod Stryker calls it can be developed from a young age, yet the tools that allow us the freedom as children to play and deeply listen like: music, painting and dancing have been cut off. When the arts or the humanities have been severed from our upbringing then as children and adolescents we have less time to explore and express ourselves from within.
Dhi as Stryker (2010) eloquently states is “more than our personal barometer or inner voice of morality––more than what helps us distinguish right from wrong…It is the inner voice of higher wisdom that knows and is capable of guiding you to do precisely the right thing at precisely the right time. In effect, dhi is the light of the inner teacher that dwells within you. Intuition is your way of hearing it (p. 253). In other words it is through the honing of light of the teacher that we can begin to clearly hear intuition.
In Rod Stryker’s Book The Four Desires, he describes a method to develop a relationship with that part of you that already knows. To make this relationship blossom, and to trust your own intuitive voice it take dedication, time, practice and eventually the courage to act from the voice of Dhi. Yet, how is it that we can learn to live in this world with all our humanness and be able to listen to that inner guidance? The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali states that “by mastering samyama [meditation in its various stages] prajna [the light of wisdom] dawns” (as quoted in Stryker, 2010, p. 253)
Personally, creating a relationship with my inner teacher has come through my own creative practice in addition to my established meditation ritual. For many years I spent time after meditation asking a single question, taking time to listen and then writing down the answers. This method then morphed into stream of consciousness writing, poetry as well as drawing images that would come when the words wouldn’t.
As we grow into adults that space that may have been filed with a trust for who we are in the world and our finest desires, may have been stuffed with facts, expectations, calculations and unfortunately someone else’s truth. It is my hunch this is why creativity is making a comeback; it’s important to spend some time in the realm of creativity, meditation and inwardly focused — to allows for the time and space to listen deeply and develop the Dhi muscle. When we know how to listen then we have the strength and courage necessary to live our lives and make all our decision from the guidance of that intimate part we now know.

 

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Chanti Tacoronte-Perez is the innovator and artist behind www.yantrawisdom.com she leads retreats and workshops internationally and has an upcoming retreat in Tulum Mexico – 7 Days of Dhi – Fearless Living

Chanti has had a paintbrush in her hand since she can remember. In 2002 she graduated from Hampshire College with a Bachelors in fine arts, (oil painting) as well as a specialization in special education. In 2005 she began to deepen her studies in The Sri Viddya Linage with Rod Stryker founder of Para Yoga. The Tantric teachings she encountered eventually lead her to the discovery of Yantra painting.

The Yantras and their symbology inspired Chanti to dive deeply into the practice of creatively healing. Chanti has recently completed her Masters at Pacifica Graduate Institute in Humanities with an emphasis on Depth Psychology. Chanti is a guide in weaving the practices of Tantra, Yantra painting and Depth Psychology; she mentors students to awaken to their purposeful creatively-engaged life.

Sva Bhava Artwork created by Chanti